MRED’ers get their hands dirty helping out the hungry

Dates: 01/01/1970 Dates: 01/01/1970 Location:

 

 

2015 candidate Rakesh Dolbson is assisted by 2007 grad Jeremy Walker and Alumni Board President Tina Heinbach, '2011. Together, they mix and match nutrients into a package that will be sealed and shipped to clinics around the world.

2015 candidate Rakesh Dullbson is assisted by 2007 grad Jeremy Walker and Alumni Board President Tina Heinbach, ‘2011. Together, they mix and match nutrients into a package that will be sealed and shipped to clinics around the world.

The volatility and excitement of our industry sometimes prevents us from taking the time to zoom out, and appreciate the luxuries we take for granted every day.

Even when we struggle in this country, we are almost all guaranteed a meal and the basic necessities to sustain life.

Yet, there are millions throughout our world who go without access to, or are intentionally prohibited from those basics, so other countries must step in to fill in the gaps.

That’s why, for the second time, the Alumni Board has encouraged graduates to meet to get their hands dirty helping out those who lack the basic necessities we take for granted.

In mid-December, five MRED grads and one current cohort met at a warehouse in south Tempe to Feed My Starving Children.

MRED’ers , Jason Comer (’07), Jeremy Walker (’07), Tina Heinbach (’11) Brian Mori (’14) and Rakesh Dullbson (’15), manned a table to package pre-prepared meals for undernourished children in Africa and other impoverished areas of the world.

With little more than a scale, some scooper spoons, and a sincere interest to do what they could, they were able to add a tiny bit of relief to starving infants and toddlers around the world. 2007 Grad Chris Medill helped with tracking and securing the packages for shipment.

Together, the 68 volunteers in the warehouse that day prepared 29,376 meals, in less than two hours.

“There’s enough food on this planet to feed every single person,” said one of the organization’s hosts, who preferred not to be named. “It’s just a matter of getting it to them.”

According to our host, the nutrients used in that one day to create the powdery mixtures – which are hydrated into stews and pastes at their destination – cost roughly $6400.

That’s less than $5.00 a meal to sustain a malnourished or dying child for weeks.

The host showed us a picture of a four-year-old girl, Shamee, who weighed barely 11 pounds (that’s the weight of the average American newborn).

Shamee had to be propped up for the picture.

We were then showed  a picture of Shamee after four months of receiving nutrients prepared in the Tempe facility.

She was playing with other children.

“I would love to be job hunting one day because starvation no longer exists,” our host said.

For more information on Feed My Starving Children, visit: http://www.fmsc.org/.